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Calling 911

Calling 911

Calling 911
Transcript

The next question I often get asked is sort of well when should I call 911 if someone has a seizure. And so I would point out that if it's a first time seizure or anything that you're uncomfortable with calling 911. Get them in the hospital. That being said, if someone has epilepsy, we have a known seizure disorder, well it's probably not particularly helpful to go into the hospital every time someone has a seizure. So when do you go in a couple of circumstances. One if the seizure is particularly prolonged, how long is a prolonged seizure? About five minutes if the seizures. Longer than five minutes call nine one one. And so one of the things that I recommend when someone's having a seizure, it's just try to look at the clock, try to get some idea of what the time is. It's hard to do when you're panicking when a loved one is having seizure, do your best. The next thing that I would sort of pay attention to is back to back seizures. So when someone has a seizure, doesn't come back to their baseline and has another seizure and bolt those circumstances back to back seizures and prolonged seizures, they probably need intravenous medication to help control their seizures. Calling 911 the paramedics in Tucson are fantastic. They're trained to recognize seizures and treat them in the field if they need it, and they'll get them to a hospital where they can get the treatment that they need. Lastly, if anyone gets hurt, if there is any injury that you think is something you can't handle, you're not sure about, get them into the hospital. Outside of that, patients don't always need to come into the hospital for seizure. Often a call to the neurologist alerting them that they had the seizure and asking for what to do next is enough.

Doctor Profile

David Teeple, MD

Neurologist

  • Certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in both Neurology and Neurophysiology
  • Special area of expertise is in Stroke, Epilepsy, Therapeutic Botox
  • Director of the Stroke Care Program at Tucson Medical Center

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